How to use Gamma Corrector

Gamma Corrector enables you to adjust your video signal to compensate for how the human eye perceives luminance, which is not in a linear or uneven way. The human eye perceives more detail in the shadow areas than it does in the highlight areas. To compensate for this, Gamma Corrector allows you to expand or compress the shadow areas in a non-linear fashion.
 
Setup

The two sliders in Gamma Corrector are calibrated to standard gamma values. It is recommended that you use either one or the other slider, but not both, if you wish to have correct numeric values.

  1. If your picture needs to be perceptively “lightened” then choose to work with the Expand slider. This “expands” the shadow area, which in-turn will also make your highlight areas seem brighter.
  2. If your picture needs to be perceptively “darkened” then choose to work with the Compress slider. This “compresses” the shadow area, which in-turn will also make your highlight areas seem darker.

  • Expand increases the luminance of the shadow areas in your picture, also lightening the highlights. The values go from 0.25 as the “most” expansion to 1.00 which is no expansion.
  • Compress decreases the luminance of the shadow areas in your picture, also darkening the highlights. The values go from 1.00 which is no compression at all to 4.00 which is the “most” compression.
  • Video Scope allows you to project one of three scopes on your preview so that you can see how your gamma adjustments are affecting your picture.
    • Waveform shows the luminance levels of your picture from black or shadow levels at the bottom to white or highlight levels at the top.
    • RGB Parade shows the luminance levels of your picture, separated out into separate Red, Green and Blue channels.
    • Histogram shows the spread and quantity of pixels from black or shadow levels toward the left side to white or highlight levels toward the right side. This scope also separates out three channels of Red, Green and Blue and the combination of all three as combined luminance represented by White. 
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